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As the UK goes into lockdown the FCA continues to update its guidance and work out how it can support the financial sector and those who rely on it through what is now undeniably, an unprecedented crisis. With questions about trading practices, vulnerable customers and reporting, the FCA has issued a series of statements over the past few weeks outlining its expectations.

Short selling

The FCA has not followed the examples of other countries such as Italy and Spain in banning short selling. Both countries have banned the practice in order to counter market volatility as the virus spreads across the world. Experts in the US have also argued strongly against short selling. However, the FCA claimed there was no evidence that it was behind the recent turmoil in the market. Indeed, they said short selling remains a useful tool in investment strategy, allowing companies to manage risks by taking long and short positions.

Vulnerable clients

Its work on vulnerable clients has been shelved as it postpones all non-essential work in the face of the pandemic. Publication of its guidance on vulnerable customers will be placed on the back burner for the time being.

However, the FCA has stepped up pressure to prevent repossessions in the fallout of the crisis. The regulator’s guidance says lenders should offer a three-month payment holiday in the face of the spreading pandemic. It should be granted where homeowners are experiencing payment difficulties because of COVID-19. This can apply where a customer first asks for leniency or if a lender feels they qualify for a break. The Government has said there is no expectation under its guidance for a lender to fully investigate the circumstances surrounding a request for a payment holiday.

“We are making it clear that no responsible lender should be considering repossession as an appropriate measure at this time.”

Christopher woolard, interim chief executive of the fca

Delayed disclosure

The FCA has urged companies to delay publication of their preliminary results for at least two weeks.

“The unprecedented events of the last couple of weeks mean that the basis on which companies are reporting and planning is changing rapidly.”

Financial conduct authority

Companies, it said, should give due consideration to the impact of the virus and that the events of the last couple of weeks meant that time tables set before the virus would mean there would be little time to achieve this.

It says it is in talks with the audit regulator, the Financial Reporting Council (FRC) and the Bank of England’s Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) about a package of measures to ensure companies take time to prepare appropriate disclosures. The FRC, for its part, has also asked companies to delay disclosing financial reports rather than produce substandard audits.

This is uncharted territory for the entire sector. The FCA’s role in this is to reduce turmoil as much as possible and put pressure on companies to maintain sustainable and responsible policies which do not cause additional stress and anxiety to their customers.


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